Category Archives: Quotes

“. . . the person who is used to inquiry tries every possible pathway as he conducts his search and turns in every direction, and, so far from giving up the inquiry in the space of a day, does not cease his search throughout his life: directing his attention to one thing after another that is relevant to what is being investigated, he presses on until he attains his goal.”

Erasistratos of Ioulis, Paralysis book 21 12; trans. by G.E.R. Lloyd, Greek Science After Aristotle [1973] 86)]

Fun with ſ

Who says Wikipedia can’t be fun? Linguists can be rather nerdy, following some excerpts from the Talk page for the long s article:

Where the bee ſucks, there ſuck I;
In a cowſlip’s bell I lie;
There I couch when owls do cry.
On the bat’s back I do fly
After ſummer merrily.
–William Shakeſpeare

Long s had a dethender to begin with, and during the medieval era thcribeth gradually thortened the dethender part until long s had no dethender to thpeak of. Descenderless long esess are an example of atrophied letter forms. Oh gee, now I’ve completely broken the pattern.

May the ſ character bloſsom like the roſe

And, may the phyſical ſpacing of it one day improve.

Ðe letter ſ is ſweet! We ſhould use it more. Alſo, braſsſmith is correct. I þink it alſo makes the word “ſcrewed” look muć better. Wiþ a compoſe key on Linux, you can uſe Compoſ, f, s to get it.

Ðiſ iſ getting ſilly.
Gettiŋ ſilly, you ſay? I ſay we revive ſome of ðeſe ‘antique’ letters, and (of courſe) briŋ ðe “eszett (“ß”)” in from German. To me it’s quite a preßiŋ ißue. I þink we need more letters!

But, more serious:

It is important to note that many languages, eſpecially Germanic ones, make words by compounding ſhorter words and word fragments. When word a made is made from a part ending in s followed by another part, the compound word ſhould ſtill be written with a final s even though it is now inſıde a word. The correct uſe of long verſus ſhort s can make the ſtructure clearer, and ſometimes remove ambiguity.

The whole duty
of Typography, as of
Calligraphy,
is to communicate
to the imagination,
without loss
by the way,
the thought or image
intended
to be communicated
by the Author.

توانا بود هر که دانا بود

شاهنامه ابوالقاسم فردوسی

An ancient metaphor: thought is a thread, and the raconteur is a spinner of yarns — but the true storyteller, the poet, is a weaver. The scribes made this old and audible abstraction into a new and visible fact. After long practice, their work took on such an even, flexible texture that they called the written page a textus, which means cloth.

Robert Bringhurst, “The Elements of Typographic Style

It is a trite remark, but one that cannot be too often repeated, that art and science go hand in hand.1

Edward Sang, mathematics teacher and civil engineer